Lament of the Wilted Quilter

100 degrees on thermometerIn much of the US, we are dealing with record heat. While some areas are scorched and dry, here in Minnesota storms have brought several inches of rain this week, and left some flooded streets and washed out roads. The resulting humidity is atrocious, and the weather person says that might be an understatement. Quilt shops may be touting “Christmas in July” and making us think of snow and crisp air. But outdoors, it is clearly a long way off! Today it is 100 degrees F here, which feels like 115 when combined with the humid air, and this is day four like this, with more coming. The garden weeds seem to love it, but I don’t!

Oh, readers in cooler locales, like wintry parts of the Southern Hemisphere, please send good tales of chilly temperatures to us frazzled souls! Especially those without air-conditioning, like little old, frazzled me, the Wilted Quilter…

Lament of the Wilted Quilter

Lamentably Unfinished Piecing Project

A Lamentably Unfinished Piecing Project

The sewing room’s full of half-finished things,
Like partly pieced toppers and tubs full of strings
All waiting for me to come piece them together,
But I am not in there because of the weather.

Please don’t get me wrong, most summers I love!
The sunshine, the garden, the sweet mourning dove,
Resplendent evenings with soft cooling breezes,
And cold ice cream treats that give me brain freezes.

Alas, not this year, for the tropical heat
Has moved from the Amazon, right to my street!
Humidity higher than any rain forest
Is set off by temperatures leaving us scorched.

The roads are sink-holing or even heat-cracking,
And not getting fixed because crews are lacking!
Amidst all this air you could cut with a knife,
Our state is shut down by political strife.

This work has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder. Three quilts still sit basted and ready for quilting
But will not get done while this quilter is wilting!
I just can’t imagine me stitching free-motion
While pouring forth sweat that well could fill an ocean.

So off I will go, to find me some shade,
And plug in the fan while I sip lemonade.
Then later, as sundown brings forth foggy scenes
I’ll soak in a tub reading quilt magazines.
Needle and thread line copyright The Curious Quilter at WordPress dot com©2011, The Curious Quilter, thecuriousquilter.net, maryeoriginals.com.

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About thecuriousquilter

Quilter, sewer, writer, gardener, mother, sister, friend, always learning, always curious.
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5 Responses to Lament of the Wilted Quilter

  1. Martin says:

    Now I am singing…

    We’re having a heat wave… a tropical heat wave….

    Hot town, summer in the city, back of my neck getting very gritty…

    Summertime, and the livin’ is easy….

  2. Mary says:

    We will survive. Thanks for the lovely poem. We can relate. Even in the basement sewing is a bit muggy this week.

  3. Deb says:

    I love your poem!! Here in Nebraska, we have missed the last few rains…but the humidity is unbearable. Of course, I live in a town along the Missouri river–where the flooding is unbelievable so we have plenty of water. It is just not in the right place!!

    Deb

  4. Laura M says:

    Great poem! If it weren’t for work and for three little boys needing to run, I’d just hide out in the air conditioning… *bleh*

  5. Meloney Funk says:

    I so feel your pain. It has not rained here most of the summer. When there are clouds, then it is just that much more humid. Praying to a soft long rain that actually cools things down.
    Stay cool.

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